Part IV: Quick and Dirty Tips to Edit Documents

Laptop and papers

Welcome to the fourth of a four part series (1, 2, 3, 4) on Technical Writing and Editing. During the Technical Writing program, all major projects had an editing component. This meant that we had to email draft projects to other students to eviscerate. As someone who holds onto work, this was terrifying. The benefit … Continue reading Part IV: Quick and Dirty Tips to Edit Documents

Part III: Conduct Professional Edits

Editing

Welcome to the third of a four part series (1, 2, 3, 4) on Technical Writing and Editing. If you’re editing someone else’s work, your revisions must look professional. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a student project, a freelance job, or a favour for a friend. It needs to look professional. That appearance of professionalism … Continue reading Part III: Conduct Professional Edits

Part II: Apply Your Learning Style to Editing

Welcome to the second of a four part series (1, 2, 3, 4) on Technical Writing and Editing. It’s always difficult to edit your own work. By the time you get to editing, you've memorized the intent of the document. Your eyes glaze over the text, skipping misspellings and grammar problems. Usually the best way … Continue reading Part II: Apply Your Learning Style to Editing

Ouroboros Style First Drafts: Write. Edit. Repeat

The Ouroboros often symbolizes self-reflexivity or cyclicality, especially in the sense of something constantly re-creating itself…in cycles that begin anew as soon as they end. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouroboros I know the first draft is supposed to be word vomit. The one thing that’s pushed during writing competitions is to just write. No self-editing because self-editing breeds stagnation. … Continue reading Ouroboros Style First Drafts: Write. Edit. Repeat

Editing Your Work (Keep Clam and Proofread*)

I work with a lot of documents at my job. The documents that I work on have already passed several reviews and have already been edited by professionals – in short, these documents have been looked at closely by a bunch of eyes. I always catch at least one important mistake.  This is true of … Continue reading Editing Your Work (Keep Clam and Proofread*)